OBJECTIVE

 

TO LEAVE ON FRIENDLY TERMS AND LEAVE A GOOD PROFESSIONAL IMPRESSION.

 

LEAVING ON BAD TERMS

 

May bring unpleasant repercussions later.
• May jeopardize chances of good recommendation elsewhere.
• Will probably influence interviewing company when checking on your references from previous employer.

 

LEAVING ON GOOD TERMS
• Former employer will be far more willing to provide a good reference at a later time.
• It’s also quite possible that the person who is leaving will be considered for another and better position with their old firm sometime in the future. Important to stay on friendly terms with former co-workers – might be able to help one another – also you might work together again.

HOW TO LET BOSS KNOW YOU ARE LEAVING
Best, most often, to approach boss on one-to-one basis. Tell him/her in person the reason for the decision. Then hand him/her a formal written notification (usually this is best done on a Friday afternoon). Should be logical, specific reasons for making a change. NEVER slip a note under a boss’s door to inform him/her. Sometimes companies will have exit interviews with employee.
Important during these meetings to be honest, informative and consistent.

TRAINING IN NEW EMPLOYEE

 

Important points to keep in mind for person who is leaving their job and is asked to break in a new employee.
• Keep discussion of office politics to a minimum!
• When identifying co-workers, say who they arc and what they do. Don’t say “This is what I think of that person.” OR “Let me tell you what’s been going on.”
• Also, it’s helpful to jot down key aspects of your job so you don’t overlook any important points.

 

BASIC RULES – For person’s taking leave of a job.
• Make it clear that you resignation is the result of a firm offer from another employer and you have made your decision.
• Right up to the last minute on the job, provide cooperative workmanship and be
professional.
• If you’re asked to break in the person who might be succeeding you, offer as much genuine
assistance as you can.
• Don’t breach any confidences you have held.
• Clear up any financial debts you may have and return all company property you might be holding.
• Two weeks notice is standard procedure. Don’t ever give less than two weeks notice.
• In your new organization don’t bad mouth the company you have left.
• In resigning, see your immediate superior and explain your move to him/her verbally. Then present him/her with a cordial letter outlining your reasons for leaving. Add something pleasant like “I’ve enjoyed my stay with you.” In the same way, acknowledge your acceptance of your new position, in writing, to your new company, expressing your pleasure in joining them.
• Don’t brag to fellow workers about your new job. It may create bad feelings with upper management and it may make your colleagues feel inadequate.